Reviews of Shibari Suspensions

 

I just held a copy in my hand and I have to say, this is one of the best rope tutorial books I know! From layout to content it is deep and beautiful, full of knowledge and really seems to be made with love.

Daorope

Really love this book […] A great companion guide to in person teaching. Personally I love how, when reading through it, I was reminded of lessons I've been taught but had slipped out of my memory.

Golddust.

GuiltySmile

I have a copy and i think its a great book, aimed towards people learning to suspend, extremely well written and illustrated. So thumbs up from me. Plenty of good info in there for people who are already suspending too, some great tips from the bunny perspective.

Ambiv4lent

I'm so pleased to have just received my copy of your book. It's full of really great information, and I've picked up some great [things] from it. Thanks for putting it together, and hope to see more from you!

J.L.

I've received this book last week and I absolutely love it. It's my new favourite shibari fusion tutorial book. It will take a while to go through it in detail, but here are a few things that jumped out right away:

- Very information-packed from start to finish. I'm amazed at just how much practical info the author managed to squeeze into this relatively slim book, and still preserve a clear and well-illustrated layout. Lots of stuff for both riggers and models, including important material on rope placement and body positioning, which I haven't seen covered in other books
- Technically brilliant and up-to-date, with great attention to detail and lots of clear, nicely-shot images. Also features a few of the more unusual techniques, like a very elegant stem reinforcement solution for a TK
- Not only is this book illustrated with pictures of models of various genders, sizes and body shapes, it also features LOTS of suggested harness adaptations/variations for different kinds of bodies. Too many shibari books pay lip service to the vague idea that "rope is for every body", but then go on to show standard cookie-cutter ties suitable for just one (slim, bendy, cis-female). This book actually walks the talk.
- Finally! A book that shows how to tie a low-hands TK and explains why this would be a more advantageous position for some models. Considering how many people (male rope bottoms especially) struggle to get their arms far enough behind their back to form a square box-shape for a parallel-arms gote, it always amazes me how infrequently the low-hands position gets covered in rope teaching.
- A good deal of info on anchor points and suspension lines, including picture tutoroals on how to hang a ring and bamboo, manage carabiners, different lock-offs and excess line techniques. Harness tutoroals feature suggested locations for upline attachment, with relevant explanations.
- Inclusive gender-neutral language throughout, in reference to both models and riggers. This may seem like a minor point to some, but it's something that really bugged me about [retracted]'s books, when I picked them up some 6 years ago. I'm glad we've moved past referring to riggers as a "he" and models as a "she", "for the sake of simplicity".

Demonicat